Ocean travel without a boat

Journal of Peter Greenwell

Month: October 2017

Cytherea alive

Random thoughts


Imagine if you will, that you get a new job somewhere…say, a baker in a bakery. You’re there for a few days and you get to meet the cast and crew of this workplace – some are new, some have been there maybe a year and others are veterans of the bread and cake making trade. Grizzled, hoary things of unenviable vintage.

One day, you turn out seventy loaves of new white bread and boy do they smell good. Your nearest workmate – let’s call her Alice – Alice has churned out ninety loaves of bread, and that’s the record she thinks a neophyte like you needs to better. But there’s another workmate – we’ll call him Gerry – Gerry points subtly to the old baker veteran up the end of the row and whispers, “But Harry there baked one hundred sixty loaves in one hit! and nobody else has ever come close to that.”

Everyone becomes reflectively silent as they take in this bit of breathless news. A quiet yet magnanimous respect for Harry descends on you and you regard him with new-found awe. One hundred and sixty mo-fucking loaves!.

160! What an unsurpassable effort! Insuperable! Harry is top dog in your smitten eyes now, big chief baker amongst bakers.

Of course, you’re no longer cognisant of the fact that before you joined the ranks of bakers, you wouldn’t have given a second’s thought about such an achievement.

I’m sure sociology has its own term for this, but I’m creative and made one up. This is a phenomenon I define as “relative heroism” and it occurs in nearly every workplace on Earth. The guy or girl who’s baked more in an hour, or arrested more criminals in a week, packed more cartons, sheared more sheep, cut more hair, served more beer, did the Kessel run quicker than Han Solo…

Elder Scrolls medals of valour

Relative heroism goes beyond the walls of the mundane workplace. It’s online too; ensconced in the virtual world. I was in a beta test for the game Elder Scrolls Online, and like most who applied to test it, I came into the beta fairly late, like a year after it commenced. Quite a few people had been accepted into the initial round of invites the developer issued, and some of these displayed the relative hero attitude. They’d been in beta for a year, therefore they were veterans; dogged, hardcore, burned-in veterans at that. So there was some condescending resentment towards the likes of myself, who was a “scrub”.

One went as far to suggest he had entitlements and perquisites with the game’s makers beyond what is probably normal in developer-tester relationship. He reasoned that the developers of the game owed him something for the time he’d put in.

He and his kith were heroes, almost of the war veteran kind, and felt they deserved some variety of reverential respect from beta-testing “scrubs” such as myself. Logically, and to the surprise of few, they didn’t get it.

Relative heroism.

Mee-gan

A piece of a free-form doggerel


Imagine if Megan went wandering somewhere…I don’t know, she left home one day, told her mother that it was too nice a day to sit inside and surf Facebook. So I came along and gave Ms Muffet oodles and acres of curds and whey.

The text editor I’m writing this with marks “Megan” as a spelling error. None of the variants I know render as acknowledged spelling either. Well, buggeration to that.

There are lots of Megans in the world, some taller than the others. Some live in the US, some hang out in the Ust Urt (or Ustyurt if you like). I wrote a story about a Megan, which is here for your pleasure. A rather salacious kind of Megan too, maybe for reasons that are mentally and socially unhealthy. I’ll revisit the life and times of that young lady one day(™). Or soon(™).

It’s a sere day

There’s this one expression in the English language that keeps an unwanted currency – all over bar the shouting. Really? If there’s still shouting in reference to the thing allegedly over, then – wait for it – it’s not over. So, it’s an inherently absurd statement. You hear it frequently with regards to sports, at least here in Australia. A team wins a close one and it spews forth: “all over bar the shouting”.

I’d dearly love to hear a commentator with wit take this execrable trite thing apart; something like “it’s all over bar the post mortem on the slab” or “it’s all over bar the post-coital cigarette”. But unfortunately we have no commentators with wit in Australia.

Blade Runner 2049 plot holes

Spoilers abound! Don’t read this if you haven’t seen the film.


  • As a civilian, how was Luv able to traipse into a police station and steal Rachel’s bones without being apprehended/shot/zapped or whatever?
  • As a civilian, how was Luv able to traipse into a police station and kill the lieutenant, after previously stealing bones, and killing the forensic scientist?
  • As a civilian, how was Luv able to deploy an armed drone and fire missiles?
  • For that matter, how are air vehicles allowed to carry armaments and use them in a public area?
  • K is a LAPD cop yet he pulls his badge out on the orphanage master, and the film states he’s in the San Diego area. Isn’t he out of his jurisdiction?
  • Why would Wallace want to send Deckard off-world to show him pain? Doesn’t a guy of his clout and power have the facilities on Earth? Since his enforcer Luv has already demonstrated a blase disregard for the law, why would it matter?
  • What made K so special that he had Deckard’s daughter’s memories implanted into him?
  • Joshi and Luv seem to have a history. How do they know one another?

I’m sure I’ll think of more as time goes by. I liked the film, despite its propensity toward artiness and consider it a worthy successor to the original.